COVID-19 vaccine information

The COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective. It gives you the best protection against the virus. The NHS is currently offering the COVID-19 vaccine to people most at risk from the virus, based on advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). COVID-19 vaccine rollout banner

We are currently prioritising the vaccine for health and social care staff at Croydon Health Services NHS Trust. We ask that you do not just turn up at the hospital's vaccine hub as we do not have a walk-in facility for members of the public and you will not be able to get a vaccination at our centre.

How do I get a COVID-19 vaccine?

If you are over 70 and have not yet been vaccinated against COVID-19 and would like to be, please contact the NHS to arrange a jab. 

The easiest way to arrange a vaccination is through the national booking service which can be accessed at www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccination.

The system allows patients to choose a time slot and location that suits them. Anyone unable to book online can call 119 free of charge, anytime between 7am and 11pm seven days a week.

If a suitable and convenient slot is not available people can also call their GP practice.

If you are not in one of the four current priority groups, you should wait to be contacted by your GP or community clinic, who will be in touch when your it is your turn to get the vaccine. All vaccination hubs are following government priority lists so you will be contacted in due course. 

Meanwhile, we must all continue to adhere to the local tier restriction rules and remember hands, face, space – please visit the Gov.uk website for more information on the national guidelines.

How safe is the COVID-19 vaccine?

The vaccines approved for use in the UK have met strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness set out by the independent Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

Any coronavirus vaccine that is approved must go through all the clinical trials and safety checks all other licensed medicines go through. The MHRA follows international standards of safety.

Other vaccines are being developed. They will only be available on the NHS once they have been thoroughly tested to make sure they are safe and effective.

So far, millions of people have been given a COVID-19 vaccine and reports of serious side effects, such as allergic reactions, have been very rare. No long-term complications have been reported.

To find out more about the vaccines approved in the UK, see:

How effective is the COVID-19 vaccine?

The 1st dose of the COVID-19 vaccine should give you good protection from coronavirus. But you need to have the 2 doses of the vaccine to give you longer lasting protection.

There is a chance you might still get or spread coronavirus even if you have the vaccine.

This means it is important to:

  • continue to follow social distancing guidance
  • if you can, wear something that covers your nose and mouth in places where it's hard to stay away from other people

How the COVID-19 vaccine is given

The COVID-19 vaccine is given as an injection into your upper arm. It's given as 2 doses. You will have the 2nd dose 3 to 12 weeks after having the 1st dose.

Advice if you're of childbearing age, pregnant or breastfeeding

There's no evidence the COVID-19 vaccine is unsafe if you're pregnant. But more evidence is needed before you can routinely be offered it.

The JCVI has updated its advice to recommend you may be able to have the vaccine if you're pregnant and:

  • at high risk of getting coronavirus because of where you work
  • have a health condition that means you're at high risk of serious complications of coronavirus

You can have the COVID-19 vaccine if you're breastfeeding.

Speak to a healthcare professional before you have the vaccination. They will discuss the benefits and risks with you.

You do not need to avoid pregnancy after vaccination. The vaccine cannot give you or your baby COVID-19.

Read the latest COVID-19 vaccine advice if you're pregnant, may get pregnant or are breastfeeding on GOV.UK

Read the latest Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and Royal College of Midwives statement on the COVID-19 vaccine and fertility