A-Z of Services

Breastfeeding Support

  • Address: Parent Education Room Antenatal Clinic Croydon University Hospital 530 London Road, Croydon, CR7 7YE
  • Reception phone number: 020 8401 3000 Bleep 576
  • Service hours: Fridays from 10:00am to 12:00pm

About the service

The community breastfeeding team provides a range of services in Croydon, to give breastfeeding mums extra support in the community.

Croydon Health Services is working with the UNICEF Baby Friendly Initiative to ensure a high standard of care in relation to infant feeding for pregnant women and mothers and babies - the aim is to ensure that mothers in Croydon receive the support, information and encouragement they need to both start and continue breastfeeding. 

If you need help or support with breastfeeding your baby please ring the Croydon Breastfeeding Support Team on 020 8714 2985

or National Breastfeeding Helpline on 0300 100 0212 open 9.30am - 9.30pm everyday.

Breastfeeding Support in Bengali / Sylheti 0300 330 5469

Breastfeeding Support in Tamil, Telugu and Hindi 0300 330 5469

Call charges to all helplines

Calls to 0300 numbers cost no more than calls to UK numbers starting 01 and 02 and will be part of any inclusive minutes that apply to your provider and call package.

The team works closely with hospital maternity services, children’s centres and voluntary organisations.

For more help, including advice on how to start breast-feeding, see the Frequently Asked Questions section.

Please download information sheets for parents in different languages from UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative.

https://youtu.be/kxppJdOro1Q

Contact us

Community Breastfeeding Support Team / Mum2Mum Peer Support Programme

Parkway Health Centre

New Addington

Croydon

Surrey

CR0 0JA

Tel:  020 8714 2985 (answering machine available out of hours)

 

Hospital Infant Feeding Team 

Croydon University Hospital

Tel: 020 8401 3000

Frequently asked questions

Why is skin-to-skin with baby recommended? 

Holding your baby against your skin straight after birth will calm your baby.  It will also steady his breathing and help to keep him warm.

This is a great time to start your first breastfeed because your baby will be alert and will want to feed in the first hour after birth.  Your midwife can help with this.

Your baby will be happier if you keep him near you and feed him whenever he is hungry.  This will remind your body to produce plenty of milk.

You and your baby can enjoy skin-to-skin contact at any stage … however you’re feeding your baby.  

How will I know baby is hungry?

It is best to look out for early feeding cues.  Waiting for baby to cry will make it difficult to attach baby to the breast.

Early feeding cues include:  Baby sucking her fist, turning her head and rooting, rapid eye movements, restlessness.

What breastfeeding position should you use?

There are lots of different positions for breastfeeding. You just need to check the following:

  • Are you baby’s head and body in a straight line? 
  • If not your baby may not be able to swallow easily.
  • Are you holding your baby close to you?  

Support her neck, shoulders and back.  She should be able to tilt her head back easily, and she shouldn’t have to reach out to feed.

Is your baby’s nose opposite your nipple?

Your baby needs to get a big mouthful of breast from underneath the nipple. Placing your baby with her nose level with your nipple will allow her to reach up and attach to your breast well.

How do I attach baby to the breast?

Hold baby’s whole body close with her nose level with your nipple.

Let your baby’s head tip back a little so that her top lip can brush against your nipple. This should help your baby to make a wide open mouth.

When your baby’s mouth opens wide, her chin is able to touch your breast first, with her head tipped back so that her tongue can reach as much breast as possible.

With her chin firmly touching and her nose clear, her mouth is wide open and there will be much more of the darker skin (areola) visible above your baby’s top lip than below her bottom lip. Your baby’s cheeks will look full and rounded as she feeds.

What are the signs that baby is feeding well?

  • Your baby has a large mouthful of breast
  • Your baby’s chin is firmly touching your breast
  • It doesn’t hurt you when your baby feeds (although the first few sucks may feel strong)
  • If you can see the dark skin (the areola) around your nipple, you should see more dark skin above your baby’s top lip than below your baby’s bottom lip
  • Your baby’s cheeks stay rounded during sucking
  • Your baby rhythmically takes long sucks and swallows (it is normal for your baby to pause from time to time)
  • Your baby finishes the feed and comes off the breast on his or her own 

How often should I feed and how much?

Breastfeeding helps to build a loving relationship with your baby.  Feel free to feed your baby whenever you see that your baby’s hungry, if your baby is upset, if your breasts are feeling uncomfortable, or just because you enjoy it!   You can never over-feed or spoil a breastfed baby! 

Newborn babies usually get hungry frequently (at least 8 feeds in 24 hours, possibly more) but as they begin to grow and take more milk, they may start feeding less often. The frequency of feeds can increase during a baby's growth spurts, which often happen at around two weeks, six weeks, three months and six months, but every baby is different.

Let your baby thoroughly drain one breast and then offer the second breast. Sometimes baby will want more milk, sometimes not. You will know when baby’s finished the first breast as he will come off on his own. 

While you are breastfeeding, get plenty of rest and eat healthily. You do not need to have a special diet in order to produce enough milk.

How do I know my baby is getting enough milk?

Keeping an eye on the number of wet and dirty nappies is a good way to tell that your baby is getting enough milk.

In the first 48 hours your baby is likely to have 2 or 3 wet nappies.  Wet nappies should then become more frequent, with at least 6 in 24 hours from day 5 onwards.

At the beginning your baby will pass a black tar-like stool (poo) called meconium.  By day 3 this should be changing to a lighter, runnier, greenish stool that is easier to clean up. 

From day 4 and for the first few weeks your baby should pass at least 2 yellow stools every day (remember it is normal for breastfed babies to pass loose stools).

Your breasts and nipples should not be sore.  If they are do ask for help (see local breastfeeding support groups).

Your baby should be healthy and gaining weight after the first two weeks.

Is dummy use a problem?

Babies who have a dummy sometimes find it difficult to remember how to attach to mum’s breast.

Your baby will be less likely to feed when they need to, so won’t take in as much milk.

What is hand expressing?

Hand expressing means squeezing the milk out of your breasts by hand.   

This can be useful if:

  • Your breasts feel uncomfortably full
  • If your baby isn’t sucking well but you still want to give him mum’s milk
  • If you don’t want to buy or use a pump to express milk
  • In the first few days it is easier to express by hand

How to express milk by hand? 

Please refer to the Department of Health ‘Off to the Best Start’ leaflet 2012, or view hand expression page on Unicef Baby friendly initiative website.

Infant Feeding Team

The hospital supports the right of all parents to make informed choices about how to feed their baby.  The Parent Education classes provide parents-to-be with up-to-date information on baby feeding and provided free of charge by this Trust.  Classes will need to be booked after 20 weeks of pregnancy, to attend between 34 to 37 weeks of pregnancy.  Ask your midwife for more information or visit Preparing for birth and looking after your baby.

The Infant Feeding Midwives are available at the Early Pregnancy Open Evening for an informal chat and information on breastfeeding.  The Early Pregnancy Open Evening is on the first Wednesday of every month from 7.30pm to 9.00pm in the Antenatal Clinic, access is via the Woodcroft Road entrance.  You do not need to book, just turn up.  You are welcome to bring a birth supporter/partner with you.

The Infant Feeding Team provide support with breastfeeding in the hospital and work closely with the Community Breastfeeding Team to ensure that women receive consistent information to enable them to get breastfeeding off to a great start and to continue to feed for as long as they wish.  Support is provided to parents on the , including the Birth Centre, Labour Ward, Postnatal ward, Special Care Baby Unit, Paediatric ward and A & E.

A weekly Breastfeeding drop-in clinic is available every Friday in the Parentcraft Room, in Antenatal clinic, further details are available in ‘Breastfeeding Who Can Help?’ leaflet given to all mums upon discharge from hospital.  Tongue Tie queries can be assessed in the Breastfeeding clinic and all Baby Café’s.

Infant Feeding Midwives

Jayne Dowsett (Infant Feeding Co-Ordinator)

Contact Details. Mary Ward, Croydon University Hospital, 530 London Road, Croydon, Surrey, CR7 7YE

Telephone number: 0208 401 3000 Bleep 576.

Local breastfeeding support groups

This Trust supports the right of all parents to make informed choices about how to feed their baby and we will support you in your decision. Breastfeeding is the healthiest way to feed your baby. There are important benefits which breastfeeding provides for both you and your baby. We therefore encourage you to breastfeed. 

Ways in which we will help you to give your baby the healthiest start:

We welcome breastfeeding on our premises. All staff throughout NHS Croydon have been trained to support you with breastfeeding

During your pregnancy you will have the opportunity to discuss infant feeding individually with your Health Professional or Breastfeeding Peer Supporter

Support from Infant Feeding, Midwifery and Volunteer Breastfeeding Support services will be available to help you establish breastfeeding in the early days. The Children’s Universal Service will be available to provide help and support throughout your breastfeeding journey

You will have the opportunity to hold your baby next to your skin as soon as possible after birth. You will not be hurried, midwifery staff will be there to support you and help you with the baby’s first feed

Your baby will stay with you at all times while in hospital. If your baby is in the special care unit you will have access at all times

We would recommend that you keep you baby close to you at all times and to feed your baby whenever he or she seems hungry. Information will be given on how to manage night feeds and how you can tell whether your baby is getting enough milk

We will you support you in maintaining your milk supply if your baby is not able to breastfeed. We will show you how to express your breastmilk by hand. You will be given a leaflet to refer to when you get home

Before you leave hospital you will be given a booklet on breastfeeding support services throughout Croydon in case you need extra help and support when you are at home. We will give you information to help you breastfeed when you are out and about in Croydon

We recommend that you avoid using bottles, dummies and nipple shields while your baby is learning to breastfeed. This is because it can change the way your baby sucks and may lead to breastfeeding difficulties

Babies do not need to be given anything other than breastmilk for the first six months. If for some reason your baby does require some other food or drink, this will be explained to you and your permission sought

Children’s Universal Service will help you recognise when your baby is ready for other foods at around six months and explain how these can be introduced

If you have chosen to formula feed your baby we will ensure that you have the knowledge to make up bottles and sterilise feeding equipment safely

This is your guide to the Infant Feeding Policy.

Mum2Mum

A Mum2Mum breastfeeding peer support programme operates in New Addington and Waddon. Peer supporters are local mothers who have breastfed their own children, and have undertaken a 20 hour training course to provide help and support to new mums.

The peer supporters run weekly drop-ins alongside the baby clinics in New Addington/ Fieldway and Waddon areas. These drop-ins are run by the supporters themselves. We have hot and cold refreshments for anyone who drops in as well as providing a listening ear and practical support and encouragement.

Wednesday 13.30-14.30 – at Aerodrome Children’s Centre (Waddon)
Thursday 09.30-11.30 – at Castle Hill Children’s Centre (New Addington/Fieldway)

Volunteer Peer Supporters

Volunteer peer supporters are mothers who have breastfed their infants for more than four weeks and have an interest in breastfeeding. These mothers are able to offer informal befriending and support to mothers who are interested in giving breastfeeding a try, within a friendly and relaxed environment.

If you would like to find out more about the role of the volunteer peer supporter within the Mum2Mum programme or Baby Cafe then please contact the Peer Support Programme on 020 8714 2985 who will be happy to provide information about the training and to advise you when and where the next training will be held.

Contact details
Trish Islam
Job title Peer Support Programme Co-ordinator
Telephone 0208 714 2985
Email may.islam@nhs.net
Address Parkway Health Centre,
Parkway,
CR0 0JA.

Stories from mums

The hospital supports the right of all parents to make informed choices about how to feed their baby.  The Parent Education classes provide parents-to-be with up-to-date information on baby feeding and provided free of charge by this Trust.  Classes will need to be booked after 20 weeks of pregnancy, to attend between 34 to 37 weeks of pregnancy.  Ask your midwife for more information or visit Preparing for birth and looking after your baby.

The Infant Feeding Midwives are available at the Early Pregnancy Open Evening for an informal chat and information on breastfeeding.  The Early Pregnancy Open Evening is on the first Wednesday of every month from 7.30pm to 9.00pm in the Antenatal Clinic, access is via the Woodcroft Road entrance.  You do not need to book, just turn up.  You are welcome to bring a birth supporter/partner with you.

The Infant Feeding Team provide support with breastfeeding in the hospital and work closely with the Community Breastfeeding Team to ensure that women receive consistent information to enable them to get breastfeeding off to a great start and to continue to feed for as long as they wish.  Support is provided to parents on the , including the Birth Centre, Labour Ward, Postnatal ward, Special Care Baby Unit, Paediatric ward and A & E.

A weekly Breastfeeding drop-in clinic is available every Friday in the Parentcraft Room, in Antenatal clinic, further details are available in ‘Breastfeeding Who Can Help?’ leaflet given to all mums upon discharge from hospital.  Tongue Tie queries can be assessed in the Breastfeeding clinic and all Baby Café’s.

Infant Feeding Midwives

Jayne Dowsett (Infant Feeding Co-Ordinator)

Contact Details. Mary Ward, Croydon University Hospital, 530 London Road, Croydon, Surrey, CR7 7YE

Telephone number: 0208 401 3000 Bleep 576.

Pump hire and nursing bras

Breast Pumps

The Breastfeeding Team have some double breast pumps that can be loaned (free of charge) for a short period (up to four weeks),  after assessment by a member of the team.  As we do not have many pumps we may have to prioritise the loan of pumps to mums in the greatest need - for example mums with a baby in special care, or for those in other particularly difficult or unusual circumstances.  

Please call the Breastfeeding Team on 020 8714 2900 or 2985

Hire of hospital grade breast pumps

Kate Manvatkar

01883 370 860

Medela Lactina or Symphony Pump Hire

0870 950 5994

Ardo Elite Pump Hire

01823 336 362

These commercial pumps, which are not portable or suitable for travelling, may be hired by phone or over the internet.     

Nursing Bras

NCT Bras – NCT line for information                             

08458 100 100

Who else can help?

Other Breastfeeding Support (Non-NHS)

National Childbirth Trust (NCT)

NCT Breastfeeding Helpline
0300 330 0771 8.00am – 10.00pm www.nct.org.uk

Details

Coulsdon

Patricia Wise

01737 552 295

Selsdon

Karen Fox (eves only)

020 8657 0384

Warlingham

Kate Manvatkar

01883 370 860

North Croydon

Jo Wittams (eves only)

020 8665 1150

 

La Leche League

La Leche League Helpline
0845 120 2918 Open 24 hours
www.laleche.org.uk

Details

South Croydon

Ivanka Lennon

020 8657 9209

 


Association of Breastfeeding Mothers (ABM)

ABM Helpline
0300 330 5453
www.abm.me.uk

Breastfeeding Network (BfN)

www.breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk

BfN Supporter Line
0300 100 0210 9.30am – 9.30pm

BfN Supporterline in Bengali / Sylheti
0300 456 2421

Breastfeeding Support in Tamil Telugu and Hindi
0300 330 5469

For information on taking prescription drugs while breastfeeding:

Email: drug-information@breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk - providing as much information (age of baby, dose, frequency and name of medication or drug) or call:

Drugs in Breastmilk Helpline - this is run on a voluntary basis by a pharmacist/BfN supporter – calls cannot be answered immediately. Please read information and factsheets on BfN website before calling
0844 412 4665

Calls to 0300 numbers cost no more than calls to UK numbers starting 01 and 02 and will be part of any inclusive minutes that apply to your provider and call package

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